• Most photographers charge either 1/2 day or full day. Be sure to be organized beforehand to get as many shots in as possible. Try to use up the entire time getting as many photos as you can think of even beyond what you obviously need right now.
  • Prepare the location and clean the products. Set up a shoot area in your facilities for moveable objects and have them arranged so the photographer can shoot one after another without having to re-stage the lighting.
  • Be sure your photographer does NOT charge royalties. Royalties mean you agree to pay for every use of a photo — every new ad, mailer, Website, etc. is a separate charge.
  • Get hi-res photos that you can then reproduce for print use. You can always convert a hi-res image to low-res for Web use, but you cannot go the other way around. This allows you more mileage for the price.
  • Get hi-res photos that you can then reproduce for print use. You can always convert a hi-res image to low-res for Web use, but you cannot go the other way around. This allows you more mileage for the price.
  • Think about background: setting a staging area with a neutral background, where possible, can save you on retouching costs later.
  • Lighting is everything with photography. A good photographer will be very careful to avoid casting shadows. Consider this when creating a shoot area. Daylight is better than industrial lights. It may be necessary to turn off fluorescent lights. The photographer will be able to determine if this will be necessary.
  • Vibrations can affect photos. It may be necessary to shut down a machine or two, depending. Keep this in mind when scheduling the shoot to be sure you don’t interfere with critical production!
  • About retouching: Find out if the photographer is willing to provide retouching in the price. Many photographers will offer to provide a low-res version of each photo and may offer to “outline” images so that professional designers can “knock out” the background. This is of significant value that would cost a fair amount of money if a designer were to do it: something worth considering when factoring photography fees.